Future energy sustainability and greenhouse gas mitigation would both benefit from man-made processes—especially one that does both at the same time. Following Professor Amin Salehi-Khojin’s research at the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the National Science Foundation awarded Salehi-Khojin with a grant for $329,793 to build on his previous breakthrough, bringing the entire process closer to commercial viability.

Prior to his two-step catalysis process, electrocatalysis relied on expensive metals like gold or silver in the reduction reaction. Not only were these metals expensive, they were also limited in their results. With this new grant, Salehi-Khojin intends to advance knowledge in the design of earth-abundant electrocatalysts by building on his previous discovery of how transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) reduce carbon dioxide.

To learn more about Professor Salehi-Khojin’s work, visit the Nanomaterial and Energy System Laboratory

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