Bio

Contact Information:

UIC Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering (M/C 251), 2039 ERF, 842 W. Taylor Street, Chicago, Illinois 60607

Office: 2035 ERF

Lab Location: 2064 ERF

Lab Website: Micro/Nanosystems and Devices Laboratory

Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 1998

M.S., Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, 1997

M.S., Mechanical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, 1993

B.E., Mechanical Engineering, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India, 1987

Best Poster Award, The ASME Micro and Nano Technology Society-Wide Forum Poster Competition at the 2011 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE), 2011

Best Paper Award, The Third ASME International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems at the 2009 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences, 2009

UIC College of Engineering Faculty Research Award, 2009

Track Chair, Micro and Nano Systems Track, The ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition (IMECE), 2007

Founding Conference Chair, the First ASME International Conference on Micro- and Nanosystems, 2007

UIC College of Engineering Faculty Research Award, 2006

Founding Chair, ASME Micro/Nano Systems Committee, ASME Design Engineering Division, 2005–09

NSF CAREER Award, 2005

Freudenstein/General Motors Young Investigator Award (Finalist), 2004

First place in the ASME Graduate Student Mechanism Design Competition, 1994

State Merit Scholarship for academic achievement, India, 1982

National Merit Scholarship for academic achievement, India, 1980

Dr. Saggere’s research interests are in the microsystems (MEMS/NEMS) technology focused on the development of enabling tools and techniques tailored to address unique or unmet challenges in medical and engineering fields. The multidisciplinary research in his laboratory is directed at developing innovative micro- and nano-scale devices through biomimetic and bioinspired design paradigms to enable new or advanced applications in prosthetics, surgery, microrobotics, microassembly and other areas. As part of this effort, his research also seeks to understand the fundamental mechanisms at play in physical and biological systems at small scales. The current thrust areas of development in his laboratory include: Neural Interfaces and BioMEMS, Piezoelectric MEMS Transducers, and Compliant Micromechanisms and Robotics.